The History of Organized Crime in China — Part 4/5

November 18, 2010

In 1937, Japan invaded China. On August 14, the Japanese launched a fierce assault on Shanghai. Chinese refugees fled to the foreign concessions hoping to be safe.

However, Du Yue-sheng had his Green Gang fight alongside Nationalist troops against the Japanese.

Three months later, Shanghai fell and Du fled to Hong Kong. The Triads would never be the same.

A month after the end of World War II, in 1945, Du returned to Shanghai.

Any respect and fear he had earned before the war had been lost. The Shanghainese saw him as a coward for running away from the Japanese and booed him when he was seen on the streets.

When the Communists won in 1949, broken and unhealthy, Du fled to Hong Kong and died there in 1951 at 66. The Communist Revolution ended the Green Gang in Shanghai.

 

However, the Communists did not destroy the Chinese underworld. With hundreds of gangs operating in other countries, power shifted out of mainland China.

In time, New York’s Chinatown would become the center of the Chinese Triads in the US.

In 1977, on Mott St. in the heart of New York’s Chinatown, a war raged between the Chinese gangs. One Chinatown gang boss, Nicky Louie, became the most feared gangster in New York’s Chinatown.

Nicky arrived in New York’s Chinatown in the 1960s along with tens of thousands of other Chinese soon after Congress changed the Chinese Exclusion Act allowing more Chinese into the US.

Work was hard to come by so young Chinese men organized street gangs modeled after the same gangs from China that the Communists had destroyed.

Nicky, ruthless and smart, quickly became the leader of a Triad gang called the Ghost Shadows.

Under Nicky’s leadership, the Ghost Shadows became more powerful and ruthless. However, Nicky wanted to control all of Chinatown. Success then made Nicky a target and he was shot many times but survived.

Return to The History of Organized Crime in China – Part 3

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

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Conclusion to Sun Tzu’s The Art of War

August 25, 2010

As I finished the series on Sun Tzu’s The Art of War, I thought of President Lyndon Johnson who invaded Vietnam (1950 to 1975)—a war where a super power lost to a third-world country as Chu did to Wu about twenty-five hundred years ago.

Nations that fought with the United States lost more than 300 thousand troops with almost 1.5 million wounded.  North Vietnam and the Communists lost almost 1.2 million troops and more than 4 million civilian dead.  Source: Vietnam War – Wiki

President G. W. Bush rushed into a war in Iraq and Afghanistan on faulty evidence, which may have been based on lies. For these wars, the casualties and losses continue.


Learn more at the War Resisters League

Several American presidents ignored Sun Tzu’s The Art of War.

Since World War II, America has spent more than 23 trillion dollars fighting wars and in defense. The U.S. won the Cold War against Soviet Russia without fighting.

Too bad the citizen of the US, Presidents Johnson and G. W. Bush did not learn from Sun Tzu’s The Art of War.

China’s Sun Tzu said, “Sometimes, the best way to win is not to fight.”

Start with Sun Tzu’s The Art of War (HQ) – Part 1 or return to Part 10

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of The Concubine Saga. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too. This is the love story Sir Robert Hart did not want the world to discover.

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The Hsiao (Xiao) – Chinese flute music

July 15, 2010

The most popular flues in China are the Dizi and the Hsiao (Xiao), which rhymes with “cow”. I wrote about the Dizi, which is a transverse flute, in March.

The Hsiao is longer than the Dizi and is used to play classical Chinese music and solo music. The Hsiao has eight holes for fingers.  The other two Hsiao flutes are the Dong Hsiao from Southern China with six holes for the fingers and the Qin Hsiao, which is used mainly to accompany the ancient seven-string Chinese zither.


Xiao Solo by Zeng Gege – Mooring by the Autumn River at Night

Chinese flutes with finger holes have been traced back to the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).  These flutes have been made from the bones of birds or animals, from stone and jade. the Dizi became common later in the western region of the Han Dynasty.

If you enjoy listening to Chinese music, you may also enjoy the Chinese opera. See Chinese Yu Opera with Mao Wei-tao

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of The Concubine Saga. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too. This is the love story Sir Robert Hart did not want the world to discover.

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Punish North Korea or Not

May 25, 2010

I read a humorous Blog post in the “Lost Laowai” about the sunken South Korean navy ship that UN investigators say was torpedoed by North Korea.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton went to China seeking help to punish North Korea. The Blog post indicated that China should do something because of the good PR that would result in the West.

Hillary Clinton in Shanghai

I doubt if the PRC cares what US citizens feel.  Since the outrage over Tibet during the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the Communists have enjoyed a surge of nationalism and want to keep it. 

With this increased popularity, why would the PRC want to solve the North Korean problem? After all, every time there is a problem with North Korea, Americans fly to China asking for help, which is another boost to national pride. If the problem is solved, no more visits.

See When China Speaks

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.


Cultural Differences and the Ignorant American in Vietnam

May 22, 2010

Another example of American ignorance and arrogance happened when I served in Vietnam. During the Vietnam war, a US senator spoke out and what he said was quoted in the media. He was angry that women could be bought and sold in Thailand, a staunch US ally. Thailand told him to stuff it and that they would continue to live and run their country as they saw fit.

Vietnam Mural

Forty years later, Thailand hasn’t changed much. Women can still be bought and sold there even though Thailand is considered a democracy.

When I was in Vietnam, we fought alongside a South Korean division–great troops to have on your side. Brutal and tough. Another US senator complained about their brutal tactics with the Vietnamese, like the time they took a suspected Vietcong and hung him upside down from a tree branch and skinned him in front of an entire village to get villagers to reveal where the rest of the Vietcong were hiding.

The South Koreans got what they wanted and cleaned out that VC nest. When that US Senator complained, South Korea said “Shove It” (that’s not exactly the language they used but it means the same thing). The South Korean’s said, if you don’t like the way we fight, we will pull our division out and send our troops home.

That senator stopped protesting and the South Koreans stayed. I fought with the ROKs on an operation and was glad to have them by my side. At that time, The South Koreans hated communist due to North Korea, which made sense then.

Discover Why the Generals Laughed

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the author of the award winning novels My Splendid Concubine and Our Hart. He also Blogs at The Soulful Veteran and Crazy Normal.

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Hollywood to Bollywood to a Rising Chinawood

May 17, 2010

“China is now the second-biggest box office territory for Hollywood films, eclipsing Japan,” says The Hollywood Reporter. Not only that, but Chinese production companies are releasing films for the home market.

It also appears that the Chinese government has done some forgiving. “Zhang Zhao fled China for the U.S. soon after the crushing of the 1989 student democracy movement. But Mr. Zhang returned to China in 1998, and now he’s the man with the money: As head of Enlight Pictures, a unit of Enlight Media and one of the new film companies aspiring to tell Chinese stories to a rapidly expanding domestic audience, he has plans for an initial slate of 40 movies, and no problem with financing.” Source: RealFilmCareer.com

A film produced by Huayi Brothers Media

Then there is Huayi Brothers Media, which the May issue of “The Hollywood Reporter” says raised 160 million in an IPO on the Zhenzhen stock exchange.  The Huayi brothers have already released over 50 films, most of them huge box office hits in China. Source: CNN: Is This China’s Harvey Weinstein?

“Five years ago,” Wang Zhongjun said, “we hoped (the Hollywood studios) could bring us support and investments. Now we’re helping them,” reports The Hollywood Reporter, which predicts box office gross in China could exceed 10 billion yuan by the end of 2010.

Discover What is the Truth about Tiananmen Square?

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of My Splendid Concubine [3rd edition]. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too. This is the love story Sir Robert Hart did not want the world to discover.

His latest novel is the multiple-award winning Running with the Enemy.

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China’s Holistic Historical Timeline


Jobless in America and Angry at China

May 17, 2010

When the economy tanks and Americans lose jobs, I often read or hear that it’s China’s fault.  Timothy V, a typical China basher that I’ve been debating on Gather, is an example. Using China as a scapegoat for lost jobs in America appears to be a popular pastime.  After all, many in America need someone to blame for the hard times.

The truth is that more jobs have been lost to Mexico and Canada than to China. Citizen.org says that because of NAFTA, Americans lost 3 million manufacturing jobs to Mexico and Canada…

The Economic Policy Institute says that between 1997 and 2006, the trade deficit between the U.S. and China could have supported 2,166,000 jobs. This report doesn’t say that manufacturing jobs were lost in America to China. It means that when China joined the WTO (World Trade Organization), jobs were created for Chinese workers that might have gone to the United States. 

What happened after America’s economic bubble popped in 2008? CNN reported that 2009 was the worst year for jobs lost in the United States since 1945.  A sobering U.S. Labor Department jobs report showed the economy lost 1.9 million jobs in the year’s final four months.

Do not forget who caused the current global economic crises and those job losses. “Global Issues.org” describes the crisis that was caused by greed in America.

If you believe someone like Timothy V, those job losses should be blamed on China, but he is wrong. The BBC reported that Chinese migrant factory job losses mount. A Chinese government official, Ma Jian Tang, told reporters in January (2009) he thought roughly 5% of the country’s 130 million migrant workers had returned to their villages after losing jobs. (Note: I wonder why I couldn’t easily find this from an American news source.)

Out of work in China

In fact, a Chinese government survey revealed that 20 million migrant (factory) workers lost jobs, posing a risk for social instability. Some 15.3 percent of China’s 130 million migrant factory workers became jobless. Since the American induced global economic crisis in 2008, Beijing says about 70,000 factories nationwide have closed.

How can anyone in China be stealing jobs from Americans? Do I need to mention the millions of jobs lost to illegals that cross America’s Southern border and take hard, low-paying jobs that Americans don’t want? According to this report from NPR, that number is about 12 million.

When I was fifteen, I started my first job washing dishes in a department store coffee shop that served lunch and dinner and I worked nights and weekends there for three years while attending high school. There were several of us doing that job, and we were all American born teens. Before I joined the US Marines, I worked in a car wash, a McDonald’s and other jobs that most Americans won’t touch today. In Steinbeck’s novels, the farm workers he writes about were mostly poor Americans who went into the fields to plant and pick—not illegals from south of the border.

In fact, the jobs are there but too many Americans won’t consider them because they won’t pay for an American middle-class credit card driven, consumer lifestyle where people eat out more than they eat in and everyone “has” to have the American dream.  Can’t buy that with low wages.

This has happened before. After World War II, American jobs were lost to Japan and Germany.  Then after the Korean War, more jobs were lost to South Korea and Taiwan as they built factories.  In the 1950s, GM, Ford and Chrysler were building and selling about 90% of the cars and trucks globally.  Then Toyota and VW arrived in the United States. Who was stealing US jobs then?  It wasn’t China.

In reality, it’s all about finding a scapegoat to slaughter while the guilty quietly slip away.

Read about American Hypocrisy

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the author of the award winning novels My Splendid Concubine and Our Hart. He also Blogs at The Soulful Veteran and Crazy Normal.

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